Opening scene from Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris (1972). Image is link to external video.


Opening scene from Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris (1972). Image is link to external video.

William Morris, 19th Century textile designer and socialist thinker


William Morris, 19th Century textile designer and socialist thinker

  Konstantin Andreyevich Ukhtomsky, 19th Century Watercolorist, from his series of paintings of the Winter Palace, Saint Petersburg

 

Konstantin Andreyevich Ukhtomsky, 19th Century Watercolorist, from his series of paintings of the Winter Palace, Saint Petersburg

Kim Keever, staged photography.


Kim Keever, staged photography.

Henri Rousseau, late 19th century French painter and toll collector


Henri Rousseau, late 19th century French painter and toll collector

Tania Kovats, "Habitat", 2011


Tania Kovats, "Habitat", 2011

David Hockney, "Woldgate Woods, 26, 27 & 30 July 2006"


David Hockney, "Woldgate Woods, 26, 27 & 30 July 2006"

Casey Jex Smith, "Jealous God", 2015


Casey Jex Smith, "Jealous God", 2015

The White Garden at Sissinghurst 


The White Garden at Sissinghurst 

Ian Hamilton Finlay, "Little Sparta"


Ian Hamilton Finlay, "Little Sparta"

"The gardenesque argues that a sense of what gardens are or were- of their scale and their particular station in the environment, of their history beyond their proclaimed absorption into nature - provides a valuable, and if necessary polemical, approach to certain aspects of contemporary art....." 

- Yves Abrioux, Notes Towards a Definition of the Gardenesque

Theatergarden Bestiarium, 1986-2011 "The exhibition is based on Bestiarium: Theater and Garden of Violence, War and Happiness (1986), an essay written by the Munich gallery owner Rüdiger Schöttle. The "Theatergarden" described in the text is rooted in the Baroque and Rococo garden of the 17th and 18th century with its natural and artificial worlds.... The concept combined projections and reflections through which the visitor moved as both an observer and actor. The mixture of paths, plants, sculptures, fountains, lakes and caves used in the formal Baroque garden awaken in the mind of the beholder stories and myths, a so-called "theater of memory". Rüdiger Schöttle wrote of a garden that is "both a window into the past and into the future".


Theatergarden Bestiarium, 1986-2011

"The exhibition is based on Bestiarium: Theater and Garden of Violence, War and Happiness (1986), an essay written by the Munich gallery owner Rüdiger Schöttle. The "Theatergarden" described in the text is rooted in the Baroque and Rococo garden of the 17th and 18th century with its natural and artificial worlds.... The concept combined projections and reflections through which the visitor moved as both an observer and actor. The mixture of paths, plants, sculptures, fountains, lakes and caves used in the formal Baroque garden awaken in the mind of the beholder stories and myths, a so-called "theater of memory". Rüdiger Schöttle wrote of a garden that is "both a window into the past and into the future".

Andy Dixon, Purple Bouquet


Andy Dixon, Purple Bouquet

"The heterotopia is capable of juxtaposing in a single real place several spaces, several sites that are in themselves incompatible. Thus it is that the theater brings onto the rectangle of the stage, one after the other, a whole series of places that are foreign to one another; thus it is that the cinema is a very odd rectangular room, at the end of which, on a two-dimensional screen, one sees the projection of a three-dimensional space, but perhaps the oldest example of these heterotopias that take the form of contradictory sites is the garden. We must not forget that in the Orient the garden, an astonishing creation that is now a thousand years old, had very deep and seemingly superimposed meanings. The traditional garden of the Persians was a sacred space that was supposed to bring together inside its rectangle four parts representing the four parts of the world, with a space still more sacred than the others that were like an umbilicus, the navel of the world at its center (the basin and water fountain were there); and all the vegetation of the garden was supposed to come together in this space, in this sort of microcosm. As for carpets, they were originally reproductions of gardens (the garden is a rug onto which the whole world comes to enact its symbolic perfection, and the rug is a sort of garden that can move across space). The garden is the smallest parcel of the world and then it is the totality of the world. The garden has been a sort of happy, universalizing heterotopia since the beginnings of antiquity (our modern zoological gardens spring from that source)." - Michel Foucault, Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias


"The heterotopia is capable of juxtaposing in a single real place several spaces, several sites that are in themselves incompatible. Thus it is that the theater brings onto the rectangle of the stage, one after the other, a whole series of places that are foreign to one another; thus it is that the cinema is a very odd rectangular room, at the end of which, on a two-dimensional screen, one sees the projection of a three-dimensional space, but perhaps the oldest example of these heterotopias that take the form of contradictory sites is the garden. We must not forget that in the Orient the garden, an astonishing creation that is now a thousand years old, had very deep and seemingly superimposed meanings. The traditional garden of the Persians was a sacred space that was supposed to bring together inside its rectangle four parts representing the four parts of the world, with a space still more sacred than the others that were like an umbilicus, the navel of the world at its center (the basin and water fountain were there); and all the vegetation of the garden was supposed to come together in this space, in this sort of microcosm. As for carpets, they were originally reproductions of gardens (the garden is a rug onto which the whole world comes to enact its symbolic perfection, and the rug is a sort of garden that can move across space). The garden is the smallest parcel of the world and then it is the totality of the world. The garden has been a sort of happy, universalizing heterotopia since the beginnings of antiquity (our modern zoological gardens spring from that source)."

- Michel Foucault, Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias

Henri Matisse, "La perruche et la sirène", 1952.  Matisse described this work as 'a little garden all around me where I can walk'.


Henri Matisse, "La perruche et la sirène", 1952.  Matisse described this work as 'a little garden all around me where I can walk'.